TourRacing2

IMN42581tr

spacer 

1952 2nd Tour of Britain

Credit: Daily Express 1952 and 1954 Race Programmes, 1952 Results and History of the Tour of Britain by Peter A Clifford (1967)

Start List - from the official results

Viking Cycles

 

Sun Cycles

 

Pennine Accessories

 

 

1 Ian Steel

 

21 Ian Greenfield

 

39 Bevis Wood

 

59 Tony Smith

2 John Welch

 

22 Leonard Wightman

 

40 Pete Southart

 

60 David Robinson

3 Edward R Jones

 

23 Leonard West

 

41 Trevor Fenwick

 

61 Tony Phillips

4 John Pottier

 

24 Lesie J Scales

 

42 Norman Yeaman

 

62 Sid Aldridge

5 Stan Blair

 

 

 

Ireland

 

London

France

 

Italy

 

43 J Lackey

 

63 John Brackstone

6 Gabriel Audemard

 

25 Michel Sanchez

 

44 Noel Morrish

 

64 Ronald Cooper

7 Charles Gregorini

 

26 Rino Giordani

 

45 Edward Hawkins

 

65 Ron Rogers

8 Robert Renonce

 

27 A Romana

 

46 C O’Reilly

 

66 Jimmie May

9 Charles Lobre

 

28 Charles Pedergnana

 

47 Conliffe Carr

 

67 L Hook

10 Edmund Pierre

 

29 Joseph Piana

 

Royal Air Force

 

Manchester

BSA Cycles

 

Wearwell Cycles

 

48 Ken Jowett

 

68 Mick Howarth

11 Robert J Maitland

 

30 Fred Williams

 

49 Ron Thompson

 

69 D B Clarke

12 Peter R Procter

 

31 Mac G Cotterill

 

50 John Fraser

 

70 Charles Mather

13 Gordon W Thomas

 

32 G M Roberts

 

51 Joe Christison

 

71 R Johnson

14 Alfred D Newman

 

33 Leslie R Drinkwater

 

52 William A Cook

 

72 N Inman

15 A Stan Jones

 

 

 

Scottish Cyclists’ Union

 

Yorkshire

West Germany

 

Belgium

 

53 Ramsey Mackay

 

73 Don Wilson

16 Karl Ziegler

 

34 Jean Bougeois

 

54 James Grundill

 

74 Johnny Pound

17 Joachim Kopitz

 

35 Albert Bodson

 

55 Alexander Marr

 

75 Douglas Petty

18 Peppi Schwaiger

 

36 Marcel Michaux

 

56 Joe Meade

 

76 John Wilson

19 Gunter Sauff

 

37 Robert De Smet

 

57 D Houghton

 

77 Kenneth Taylor

20 Guenther Doelle

 

38 G Van Den Dooren

 

Romford RC

 

Ellis-Briggs

 

 

 

 

58 William Bellamy

 

78 Ken Russell

The Nation’s Greatest Cycling Event

ToB1952Cover2THE Second Daily Express Tour of Britain, the greatest cycle race Britain had ever seen, ended in Alexandra Palace, London, on September 6th. It was won by the man the experts said 'could not possibly win', Ken Russell, romping home on a borrowed machine for the final 30 miles, swung into the Palace grounds to the deafening roars of thousands of spectators, and finished in second place on the last stage and first place on overall general classification.
Ken, a 22-years-old salesman of the cycles he rides, had been race leader, wearer of the Yellow Jersey, for nine of the 14 racing days. Without team support, up against the combined might of the country's strongest and most highly organised teams, he held grimly to his lead over the final stages. No amount of attacking, no team tactics by others could unsettle him. Alone he met every challenge - and attacked in return.
Not only had he to ride against 'independent' (semi-professional) and amateur teams from this country, but national teams from Scotland, Ireland, France, Italy, Belgium and Germany. In addition to these six national teams, there were five ' independent ' British teams and five top-class amateur teams.
Of the Continental teams, the Belgian riders did the best. They finished in fourth place in the team race, and their best man, Marcel Michaux, filled eighth position in the race as a whole. Indeed it was Michaux who provided the most sporting gesture of the whole race. For Michaux it was who, when only 30 of the 1,470 miles remained, loaned his machine to Russell. Russell's cranks were working lose and a tyre was softening. Michaux, casting aside all chances of a personal win on the last stage (and he had set his heart on that one victory), unhesitatingly switched machines with Russell, dropping back himself to effect repairs. Among the nine teams to finish, the Scottish national team filled eighth place, and the Irish team ninth. The French and Italian teams lasted only four days, giving as their excuse 'lack of beefsteaks'.
The German team fared better, but were dogged by bad luck right from the start. Last German, Peppi Schwaiger, kept in the race until Edinburgh. The tough climb over Carter Bar on the Edinburgh to Newcastle stage proved too much for him, and he too retired.
Worst hit by bad luck were the Irish and R.A.F. teams. Day after day some misfortune would befall the Irishmen ; accidents, mechanical trouble and every adversity seemed to come their way.
The R.A.F. team could only finish two riders- a minimum of three is required to gain a team placing. Their captain, Ken Jowett, retired after crashing at Weston-super-Mare. Ron Thomson crashed later and retired, and John Fraser pulled a muscle between Nottingham and Norwich which forced him to come out of the race.
Altogether, 35 of the 78 men who started out from Hastings failed to reach the finish. This gives some idea of the toughness of the course, the fierceness of the struggle.
At such a pace, team work becomes important. It was here that the B.S.A. riders scored so brilliantly. Led by Bob Maitland, they were continually at the head of affairs. There was hardly ever a serious breakaway without at least one of their number being part of it. From the time they took over the lead in the team-race section of the event, after the fourth day, they were not once seriously challenged.

ToB52-RussellMichaux
Marcel Michaux presents the trophy to Ken Russell
Opposite tactics were employed by the Sun Cycles team. After losing one of their best men in Len Wightman, who was forced to retire after a crash, the team concentrated on winning the individual race rather than the team event. In this they were very nearly successful. Les Scales, the man they wanted to see in first place, at one point took over the Yellow Jersey, eventually finished second on general classification. His team-mates, Ian Greenfield and Len West, sacrificed their own chances for the benefit of Scales.
Viking Cycle riders, who had won both the individual and team awards in the first Tour of Britain, had to be content with second placing in the team contest and fifth in the individual classification. Ian Steel, last year's winner and leader of the Viking team, was the most marked man in the whole race.
The best amateur team, without any doubt, proved to be the Romford R.C. team - the only one of its kind in the race. All other amateur teams represented areas, not individual clubs.
The Romford leader, Bill Bellamy, was holder of the Yellow Jersey for two days. Often the clubmen were very close to the team-race leaders. When Bellamy had to come out of the race with a fractured bone in the spine, the Romford lads had Dave Robinson to take over as leader - and as best amateur in the field. The club filled fifth place in the team classification, and Robinson finished ninth in general classification - best amateur by more than 25 minutes. Next amateur to him was Tony Phillips, in 21st place. Tony's club? The Romford R.C.
All this intensive team-racing made Russell's chances seem remote. When he took the lead and the Yellow Jersey after the second day, the experts - and many of the riders- said he could not hold his lead. When he lost the lead to Bellamy - at Carlisle - and later dropped to third behind Scales and Maitland, it seemed that the stocky Bradford lad was on the way down. Yet he sprang back into the lead at Scarborough, and held it over the final three stages, never once faltering.

ToB52-RussellEBThe phenomenal speed at which the race was run proved the downfall of many - and indicated the remarkable fitness of the 43 men who survived.
Those who said, 'They cannot possibly keep it up,' were proved wrong. Even the riders themselves believed that the pace would slow down towards the end. But it did not. On the very last stage the leaders raced into Alexandra Palace well up on a revised schedule based on 24 m.p.h. average.
Over the whole de-neutralised section of the race, a speed of 25.4 m.p.h. was full
maintained. The average speed for the full distance, including the neutralised processions out of starting towns when no racing was allowed and the field rode slowly, was above 24 m.p.h.
This speed was something quite unheard of for road racing in Britain. Even by Continental standards it was truly remarkable.
What of the racing men themselves - the men who rode at this amazing speed for 14 days? What does it mean to take part in the Tour of Britain?
Many of the men were amateurs. For them, it meant taking time off from work in order to compete. For these fellows, it was their summer holiday. For many, there will be no holiday with wife or family, this year.
Their machines, too, had to be paid for out of their own pockets. These machines cost anything up to 60 each. Then there are spare wheels, tyres, spokes and small parts, all be provided.
When the race set off from Hastings, the field was worth, in machines alone, more than 4,800. Behind them were cars and vans carrying spare machines and parts worth more than 3,200. The riders themselves carried spare tubular tyres either round their shoulders or fixed behind the saddle. These alone were valued at 900.
In addition to all this, two service vans carried spares valued at more than 2,000 each. Food worth 210 was handed up to riders during the actual racing ; feeding bottles, musettes (the small bags used for handing up food), sponges and buckets amounted to another 200. Two thousand hotel beds were used during the 16 days by riders and officials.
The organisation of this great enterprise was in the hands of the Daily Express and the British League of Racing Cyclists, under whose rules the race was run.
Of all the great riding during the Tour, Ken's will stand out for many, many years as one of the most courageous and most daring. In the following pages you are presented with the account of the race from stage to stage. Read the story of Ken's performance and the riding of other competitors in this greatest British cycle race ever presented - the Second Daily Express Tour of Britain.

Race Route -  22-August to 6-September

Hastings - Southsea - Weymouth - Weston-super-Mare - Cardiff - Aberystwyth - Blackpool - Carlisle - Glasgow - Dundee - Edinburgh - Newcastle - Scarborough - Nottingham - Norwich - London Alexandra Palace.

For the route in detail - see Stages 1 to 7>> and Stages 8 to 14>>
 

Stage Results

Final General Classification

Stage

1st

Time

2nd

3rd

1

John Brackstone

4.12.27

Ken Russell

Ken Jowett

2

Ken Russell

3.38.48

G Gregorini

D Wilson

3

A Stan Jones

3.14.35

Michel Sanchez

Gordon Thomas

4

Charles Gregorini

5.01.53

Les J Scales

Ken Russell

5

Ken Russell

7.58.37

Les J Scales

David Robinson

6

Les J Scales

3.36.35

Johnny Pottier

Bevis Wood

7

G Van Den Dooren

3.58.19

Bevis Wood

Gordon Thomas

8

Les J Scales

3.11.29

Gordon Thomas

Ken Russell

9

Ian Steel

3.59.33

D Wilson

Bevis Wood

10

Les J Scales

4.32.37

Norman Yeaman

Bob Maitland

11

Ken Russell

3.12.45

Ian Steel

Trevor Fenwick

12

Trevor Fenwick

4.38.03

Johnny Pottier

Ian Steel

13

Gordon Thomas

5.04.28

A Stan Jones

Johnny Pottier

14

Les J Scales

4.53.27

Ken Russell

Bob Maitland

Pos.

Rider

Time

1

Ken Russell

61.26.49

2

Les J Scales

61.29.49

3

Bob Maitland

61.31.59

4

Ian Greenfield

61.39.08

5

Ian Steel

61.39.40

6

Gordon Thomas

61.43.58

7

Bevis Wood

61.44.58

8

Marcel Michaux

61.50.00

9

David Robinson

61.50.30

10

William Cook

61.52.34

11

G Van Den Dooren

61.53.24

12

Peter Procter

61.53.36

13

Alf Newman

61.56.12

14

Stan Blair

61.56.54

15

Trevor Fenwick

61.58.01

16

Norman Yeaman

62.00.03

17

Johnny Pottier

62.02.29

18

Albert Bodson

62.03.22

19

Jean Bougeois

62.09.37

20

Joe Christison

62.10.56

21

Tony Phillips

62.15.58

22

D B Clarke

62.26.25

23

A Stan Jones

62.29.33

24

John Welch

62.31.17

25

Alexander Marr

62.33.09

26

Joe Meade

62.34.29

27

Kenneth Taylor

62.34.39

28

Charles Mather

62.37.22

29

Don Wilson

62.38.21

30

Doug Petty

62.39.43

31

L Hook

62.41.07

32

Len West

62.41.16

33

James Grundill

62.41.37

34

Sid Aldridge

62.57.10

35

Mac G Cotterill

62.58.58

36

D Houghton

63.26.04

37

Edward Hawkins

64.07.02

38

John Wilson

64.09.42

39

C O'Reilly

64.13.22

40

Ramsey Mackay

64.47.27

41

Jimmie May

64.58.42

42

Fred Williams

65.08.27

43

Noel Morrish

66.00.49

SixDayEmail200 Contact @

ICSlogo1 for all sites

BannerSixDay200

Corner2

IMP03849tr

0901_GreenHosting_120